Civil Engineering Apprentices Get A Head Start In The Working World – Kenna Warren, Finlay Steer & Ver-se Abudar

Kenna Warren, 52, assessor/trainer for built environment and civil engineering apprentices at UHI Inverness College.

Kenna Warren, 52, assessor/trainer for built environment and civil engineering apprentices at UHI Inverness College.

Having been involved in civil engineering administration for several years, I wanted to retrain, but quitting my job and becoming a full-time student was never an option. However, modern apprenticeship gave me the opportunity to learn, complete an HNC, and start my career as a civil engineering technician, while maintaining a full-time job. Learning theory while on block release at UHI Inverness College gave me a solid foundation while gaining hands-on experience within my workplace at Moray Council. Through the experience I gained both professionally and academically, I was awarded the ICE Quest scholarship and became professionally qualified as a MICE Tech Eng.

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A few years later, the Graduate Apprenticeship allowed me to resume my studies, still on a work-study basis, where I obtained my Civil Engineering Diploma.

Ver-se Abudar, 23, apprentice engineer at Tilbury Douglas and student at the University of Strathclyde.

I believe that apprenticeships at any age are an ideal way to learn while earning a full-time salary, gain experience, advance your career and become professionally qualified. So much so that I now work as an assessor/trainer with apprentices, guiding them through their learning journey.

Finlay Steer, 20, an undergraduate engineer in the infrastructure development team at WSP.

After my fifth year in high school, I realized full-time college was not for me and started looking for alternatives when I came across graduate apprenticeships. I’m in my third year of a four-year civil engineering course, where I work four days a week and attend college one day a week. This works really well for me because not only am I studying while earning a full-time salary, but I’m also gaining years of valuable work experience, which effectively puts me years ahead of my peers who have gone the college route. traditional.

A civil engineering apprenticeship also speeds up the professional qualification process, not only helping you gain the relevant work experience required earlier in your career, but the university course also teaches the theory behind many of the practical tasks you undertake on the job. workplace, which contributes to enriching the understanding of civil engineering. I would recommend the apprenticeship route to anyone unsure about college and wanting to get into the working world!

Finlay Steer, 20, an undergraduate engineer in the infrastructure development team at WSP.

Ver-se Abudar, 23, apprentice engineer at Tilbury Douglas and student at the University of Strathclyde.

Doing an apprenticeship has been beneficial to my career in many ways. It allowed me to learn my calling in the way that best suited me, and it helped me gain multiple early industry contacts. I’ve always been someone who learned best through hands-on application and doing things with my hands, so my apprenticeship gave me the opportunity to learn real engineering theory at home. university and to apply it simultaneously in my workplace. This complementary blend of theory and practice has already served me well in my current role, and I know it will continue to be very beneficial throughout my career.

I also had the opportunity to work closely with the industry and the Institution of Civil Engineers at a fairly early stage, helping them promote learning and the industry. I recently received an ICE Quest scholarship which, together with all the experience I am gaining, will go a long way in helping me get professional accreditation much sooner than usual.